Bioscience

Genomes help track selective breeding in dogs

January 14, 2010

By Flinn Foundation

[Source: RedOrbit] – From the Dachshund’s stubby legs to the Shar-Pei’s wrinkly skin, breeding for certain characteristics has left its mark on the dog genome. Researchers have identified 155 regions on the canine genome that appear to have been influenced by selective breeding.

With more than 400 distinct breeds, dogs come in a wide range of shapes, sizes, fur-styles, and temperaments. The curly-haired toy poodle, small enough to sit in a teacup, barely looks or acts like the smooth-coated Great Dane tall enough to peer like a periscope out of a car’s sunroof. Not so apparent are breed differences in how the dogs’ bodies function and their susceptibility to various diseases.

For more information: Genomes Help Track Paw Prints Of Selective Breeding In Dogs