Bioscience

Arizona launches Biozona brand

June 28, 2006

By Flinn Foundation

Welcome to Biozona!

This message will be increasingly seen and heard as the Arizona research and business communities look to develop the state’s new identity for its bioscience endeavors.

Despite possessing competitive assets, and having made perhaps more progress over the last five years than perhaps any other state or region, Arizona lacks a prominent identity in the biosciences. It’s true outside of Arizona–and often, here at home.

Biozona logo

“Arizona’s biosciences need to be more than a concept—they should be thought of as a place, a destination with their own attributes and personality,” said Steve Lynn, Vice President for Communications and Government Relations for UniSource Energy in Tucson. Lynn and TGen Chief Operating Officer MaryAnn Guerra co-chaired a committee that developed the brand.

“Biozona is a place where science thrives while creating a higher quality of life for all residents,” Lynn said.

Along with its tagline—advancing science, enhancing life–the Biozona logo presents a progressive, distinctive look that goes beyond the iconic double helix used my many states and regions. Biozona’s symbol, depicting sunlight refracting across the state, represents knowledge and empowerment, while hinting of molecular activity in an abstract manner.

The need was initially outlined by Battelle in its 2002 report, Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap. Among the many recommendations, the report stated that Arizona needed to build an image to brand the state as a bioscience center. A brand is critical to further in-state education and awareness efforts, and to market Arizona to out-of-state audiences.

In late 2005, a network of communications and marketing officials aligned with the Roadmap set out to tackle the job in collaborative fashion. Representing 35-plus research and economic development organizations from Flagstaff to Tucson, they built on a preliminary effort initiated by the Governor’s office in 2004.

Look for the brand to appear at trade shows, on marketing materials, Powerpoint presentations, websites, emails, and newsletters–for starters.

“We could build one of the nation’s strongest research hubs, but it won’t do any good if no one knows about it,” said Martin Shultz, chair of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap Steering Committee. “Biozona is here–and it’s here to stay.”


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